New Measures Taken To Stop Leaks Of Classified Information

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(CNN) — Director of National Intelligence James Clapper is expected to roll out new measures aimed at ending leaks of classified information after a spate of recent leaks.

Those leaks affected an ongoing intelligence operation against the al Qaeda arm in Yemen back in May, and included recent disclosures about the classified drone program and a cyber warfare program known as Stuxnet, aimed at an Iranian nuclear enrichment facility.

A source tells CNN that Clapper believes the source of such leaks span multiple government agencies, departments and branches of government.

While the new measures are expected to apply only to the intelligence community that Clapper oversees, they are not expected to apply to members of the National Security Council, who advise the president on sensitive and classified programs.

Separately, the FBI is conducting its own investigation of two leaks — the report about a mole who helped thwart a Yemen bomb plot targeting the United States, and the other about how the United States and Israel were behind Stuxnet, the mysterious computer virus that caused Iranian nuclear centrifuges to spin out of control.

Republican Sen. John McCain of Arizona has accused the White House of leaking classified information in an effort to make the president appear tough on national security just months before the presidential election.

White House officials have emphatically denied the claims, and some high-profile Democratic lawmakers have come to their defense.

Clapper has met with the top-ranking members of both the House and Senate intelligence committees in recent weeks and is expected back on Capitol Hill again this week to detail the new measures.

CNN has previously reported that one expected measure will call for an enhanced counterintelligence polygraph test, and for a specific question about whether an employee has disclosed classified information to a member of the media to be added to that test.

Clapper is expected to call on others in Washington who have expressed outrage over the leaks in recent weeks to follow suit and implement tougher measures of their own.

By Suzanne Kelly – CNN Intelligence Correspondent

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