Family And Friends Mourn The Loss Of Trooper Deatherage

MADISON COUNTY, IL. (KTVI) – Family and friends are mourning the loss of an Illinois State Trooper.  Thirty-two year-old Kyle Deatherage was making a traffic stop Monday morning, and was standing next to a car when a passing tractor trailer hit him. Deatherage died at the scene. This all happened about 10 miles north of Litchfield on I-55.  In Deatherage`s small community, word of the tragedy traveled fast.

Before joining ISP as a motorcycle trooper, Deatherage worked for the Madison County Sheriff’s Office. FOX 2 is told he made the switch to spend more time with his family.
Deatherage lived in St. Jacob, Illinois, and is survived by his wife, Sarah, and their two children, ages 4 and 10 months.

The state trooper also leaves behind his parents and several siblings, including Kenny, a teacher at Triad High School.  

Marine resident Brenda Grigg says, “I received an email today from my husband who teaches with Kenny at the high school.”

Grigg is a family friend of Deatherage’s brother, and says this devastating loss will be felt by many. She explains, “Our thoughts go out to their family, and prayers, and this community can’t say enough good things about their family.”

The father of two will also be sorely missed at work. ISP Master Sgt. William Guard says, “He was a very well, very liked officer, he did his job excellently. Several of the officers who work for me I spoke with prior to coming down here, they all knew him and said he was an outstanding trooper, very well liked.”

Unfortunately, this is the second recent loss that Illinois State Police has dealt with.  Master Sgt. Bob Price drowned in a boating accident in Hillsboro in September.

Guard says these tragedies are tough to handle: “It’s gonna weigh on the heart of the department and other law enforcement. I’ve had a lot of other officers in the area I work in already call and give their condolences…it’s pretty sad that it occurs, especially around the holidays.”

Deatherage’s death is a sad situation that Illinois law is meant to prevent. If drivers spot flashing lights on the road ahead, they’re supposed to slow down, or move over to another lane.

No word at this point on whether the driver of the tractor trailer will be charged.