Pictures Reveal Rising Ship & Sinking Mississippi

Posted on: 8:12 am, November 30, 2012, by

ST. LOUIS, MO (KTVI) – The Mississippi river level continues to drop.  It’s currently two feet below normal and is expected to drop six feet below in two weeks.

The Army Corps of Engineers is slowing the flow at dams in the Missouri river as required by law.  That’s why  bussiness and political leaders in several states asked president obama this week to order the corps to release more water, or the economy will suffer even more.

At risk, billions of dollars in barge traffic that would be halted.

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  • Coast Guard Cutter CHEYENNE moored at homeport undergoing brief repairs before getting underway to update channel markers and survey water conditions. The shore line appears to be encroaching on the vessel, however, the homeport was recently dredged to withstand a -7 ft gauge in St. Louis, nearly a foot lower than the historic record low set in 1940. The U.S. Coast Guard is moving 4 similar vessels to the region to assist with the effects of low water.

  • Dredge Potter, dredging a section of Upper Mississippi River, south of St. Louis Harbor.

  • Close Quarters Navigation, as the river levels drop river depth decreases and the river banks recede. As a result the fleeting areas (areas where barges are picked up and dropped off) move closer to the channel. This makes for tight quarters while vessels navigate the river.

  • A WWII vessel rises out of the water during falling river levels. The vessel, a WWII minesweeper, was a museum ship in St. Louis and swept away during the flood of 1993 and usually remains underwater year-round.

  • A WWII vessel rises out of the water during falling river levels. The vessel, a WWII minesweeper, was a museum ship in St. Louis and swept away during the flood of 1993 and usually remains underwater year-round.

  • Sand bars form around USACE River training structures. These dikes help keep the channel dredged during the year and are normally submerged, however, low water conditions have brought them above the waterline and revealed large sandbars.

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