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Bachmann Looks Forward To ‘Limitless’ Future, But Not In The House

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WASHINGTON (CNN) — Rep. Michele Bachmann, a conservative firebrand whose bid for president last year ended after the Iowa caucuses, will not seek re-election to her Minnesota congressional seat in 2014.

Making her announcement in a video posted to her campaign website early Wednesday, Bachmann stressed she had no plans to fade from public view.

“Looking forward, after the completion of my term, my future is full, it is limitless, and my passions for America will remain,” she declared.

Bachmann, who’s in her fourth term representing Minnesota’s 6th District, promised that there “is no future option or opportunity” that she “won’t be giving serious consideration if it can help save and protect our great nation for future generations.”

She staved off a tougher-than-expected challenge for her seat last November against Democrat Jim Graves, winning by just under 5,000 votes. Graves has announced he will seek the seat again in 2014.

In her video announcement, Bachmann said her decision was not influenced by any concerns about winning re-election.

“I’ve always, in the past, defeated candidates who were capable, qualified, and well-funded. And I have every confidence that if I ran, I would again defeat the individual who I defeated last year, who recently announced that he is once again running,” Bachmann said.

Nor was her decision based on any concerns over an ongoing congressional ethics inquiry into the improper transfer of campaign funds, Bachmann said in her video. She is also facing a Federal Election Commission complaint about her former presidential campaign.

“This decision was not impacted in any way by the recent inquiries into the activities of my former presidential campaign or my former presidential staff,” she said. “It was clearly understood that compliance with all rules and regulations was an absolute necessity for my presidential campaign. And I have no reason to believe that that was not the case.”

Bachmann’s run for president in 2012 reached its peak in August 2011, when she beat out a slate of other candidates to win the Ames Straw Poll in the early voting state of Iowa, where she was born. Her campaign lost steam in the fall to other conservative candidates such as Rick Perry, Herman Cain, Newt Gingrich and Rick Santorum, and she eventually placed sixth in the first-in-the-nation Iowa caucuses in January 2012. She ended her presidential bid the next day.

In the eight-minute long video, Bachmann, an early supporter of the tea party movement, touted her work on a variety of conservative issues, promising to “to work vehemently and robustly to fight back against what most in the other party want to do to transform our country into becoming, which would be a nation that our founders would hardly even recognize today.”

Bachmann was one of the leading supporters of the emerging tea party movement in 2010, founding the “tea party caucus” in the House of Representatives and delivering her own “tea party response” to President Barack Obama’s State of the Union address. Most recently, she organized a tea party rally on Capitol Hill protesting the Internal Revenue Service’s admitted targeting of conservative groups applying for tax exempt status.

In her video, she said she wouldn’t let up on the causes she championed as a U.S. representative.

“I promise you I have and I will continue to fight to protect innocent human life, traditional marriage, family values, religious liberty, and academic excellence,” Bachmann said.

CNN’s Kevin Liptak and Martina Stewart contributed to this report.

By Alison Harding

CNN
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