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6th grader attacked by dog while walking to school

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ST. LOUIS, MO (KTVI) – The dog that attacked a 13 year-old boy in north St. Louis is still on the loose. It happened Tuesday morning, while the boy was walking to school.

Antwon Moore and his friend were heading down Minerva Avenue near Goodfellow at around 8 in the morning, when a black and white dog, which looked like a pit bull and had a limp, approached them and attacked.

“That’s when the dog bit me the first time, when we ran from it,” says Antwon.

The dog chased the boys a block over to Romaine Place, where they quickly hid in the bed of a pickup truck. Then they jumped out, thinking the coast was clear.  “That’s when the dog came back,” explains Antwon, “when I was running, and when I brought my left arm back, the dog had bit me. His top teeth slid across my arm and cut me open.”

The two boys finally made it back to his friend’s house, where the parents called an ambulance, and tried to stop the bleeding.

Instead of going to school, the 6th grader ended up in the Children’s Hospital ER, getting his arms sewn back up.

“There was actually a hole in his left arm, like widely open, and the right arm was punctured all the way through,” says his mother, LaTasha Bradford.

All his mother could think about was finding that dog.  She explains, “My thing is, to get the dog off the street because it’s in an area where there’s a school. My son goes to Ford Elementary. There’s plenty of kids in this area that do walk to school. I don’t want anyone else’s kid bit like that. And if they’re smaller than my child, it could be worse.”

Animal Control is still searching for the dog, so Antwon has to get rabies shots, as a precaution.  But the only time this brave 6th grader cried was when the doctor told him he had to take a break from playing sports.

“I don’t like missing sports,” he says, “I just want them to find the dog, because I don’t want it to happen to anybody else.”

Animal control urges the owner of this dog to turn it in, and asks if anyone has any information, to call 911.

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32 comments

  • RETIRED1

    The dog and the irresponsible owner that abandoned it or let it run loose both need to be put down!

      • sarah mills

        lol steve I wonder what you will be caught with when you die? lol. Silly you poking fun at Trayvon Martin’s death… skittles though? I feel bad for your life, oh sorry you dont have one, lol your always on here!!

  • Darrin Stephens

    Aurora, Colorado
    Population 339,030

    Also in March, Aurora released statistical data showing a significant reduction in the volume of pit bull attacks and pit bulls euthanized after adopting a pit bull ban in 2005.

    “Since the ban has been in place, bites are down 73 percent from pit bulls,” said Cheryl Conway, a spokeswoman for the city’s animal care division.
    She described various problems the city encountered before enacting the ban in 2005 that included irresponsible owners letting the dogs run at large, and owners using pit bulls to taunt pedestrians.

    She added that the dogs placed a tremendous burden on city staff. According to city documents, before the ordinance was enacted in 2005, up to 70 percent of kennels in the Aurora Animal Shelter were occupied by pit bulls with pending court disposition dates or with no known owner. That number is now only 10 to 20 percent of kennels.

    “There hasn’t been a human mauling in many years. Complaints and requests related to pit bulls are down 50 percent. Euthanasia of pit bull dogs is down 93 percent. Of those few that are put down, they are primarily those that come in as strays and their owners don’t come to claim them,” she said.
    ************************************************************
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Population 415,068

    After the City of Omaha adopted a pit bull law in 2008, Mark Langan of the Nebraska Humane Society, who opposed the law, said in September 2009 that pit bull biting incidents were down 35% since its adoption:

    “Despite the attack of Haynes, The Humane Society’s Mark Langan says pitbull bites are down since new laws went into effect last year. Langan says so far this year 54 bites have been reported compared to 83 last year.”

    In September 2010, the Nebraska Humane Society provided bite statistical data to city council members and an evaluation of the effectiveness of the pit bull ordinance adopted by the City of Omaha in late 2008.

    “It is the position of the Nebraska Human Society that this ordinance has been effective in reducing bites involving dogs defined as “Pit Bulls” in the ordinance.”

    Judy Varner, President and CEO, Nebraska Human Society
    Varner’s attached statistical data shows that bites by pit bulls dropped 40% after one year of the adoption of the ordinance, 121 bites in 2008 down to 73 bites in 2009. The bite rate dropped even further in 2010.

    2008 Pit Bull Bites: 121 Total
    2009 Pit Bull Bites: 73 Total
    2010 Pit Bull Bites (through August): 28 Total

    In January 2013, the Nebraska Humane Society reported that pit bull bites dropped to 31 in 2012, down from 121 in 2008 (a 74% reduction), the year that Omaha enacted a progressive pit bull ordinance.

    2008 Pit Bull Bites Total: 121 (pre-breed specific ordinance)
    Level 2: 52; Level 3: 58, Level 4: 8; Level 5: 3 (69 were Level 3-5 attacks)

    2009 Pit Bull Bites Total: 73
    Level 2: 49; Level 3: 17; Level 4: 4; Level 5: 3 (24 were Level 3-5 attacks)

    2010 (through August) Pit Bull Bites Total: 28
    Level 2: 19; Level 3: 6; Level 4: 2; Level 5: 1 (9 were Level 3-5 attacks)

    2012 Pit Bull Bites Total: 31
    No bite level break down provided
    ***********************************************************
    Saginaw, Michigan
    Population 51,230

    In November 2012, Saginaw reported a reduction in dog attacks eighteen months after enacting a “Light” BSL ordinance1 requiring owners of the top 5 dangerous dog breeds2 to comply with new regulations.

    Eighteen months after Saginaw created its dangerous dog ordinance, put into effect in June 2011, Saginaw City Chief Inspector John Stemple said it has helped to lower the amount of dog attacks in the city.

    “It was the government reacting to a problem,” Stemple said. “And if you look at the numbers, it’s been very effective.”

    The ordinance requires residents to register dogs whose breeds are deemed “dangerous” at the City Clerk’s office, post a “Dog on premises” sign in the front of their homes and when outdoors, keep their animals either on a leash or within a 4-foot-high fenced area or kennel.

    The breeds included in the ordinance are pit bulls, presa canario, bull mastiffs, rottweilers and German shepherds.

    Stemple said he has heard from employees at Consumers Energy and the U.S. Postal Service that the signs and tethering rules have made their work safer. The number of reported dog bites fell in 2011 to nine, from 24 in 2009.

  • Darrin Stephens

    20 People dead by dog attack in 2014
    Pit bull type dogs killed 17 of them.
    Eleven of the dead are children.

    Stars indicate people killed by a ‘family’ pit bull – ones that had
    been raised and cherished as an indoor pet, ‘never showed aggression
    before’, and knew the victim.

    Child fatalities by pit bull type dog (10)
    Kara E. Hartrich, 4 years old, Bloomington, Illinois. **
    Je’vaeh Maye, 2 years old, Temple Texas.
    Braelynn Rayne Coulter, 3 years old, High Point, North Carolina. **
    Kenneth Santillan, 13 years old, Patterson, N.J.
    Raymane Camari Robinson, 2 years old, Killeen, TX
    Mia Derouen, 4 years old, Houma, Louisiana
    Christopher Malone, 3 years old, Thornton, MS **
    John Harvard, 5 year old, Riverside, AL
    Demonta Collins, 13 years old, Augusta, Georgia
    he dashed into traffic as he was running from a pit bull attacking him and was hit by a car and was killed.
    Davon Jiggetts,17 years old, Riverdale, Georgia
    he dashed into traffic as he was running from a pit bull attacking him and was hit by a car as was the pit bull, both were killed.

    Adult fatalities by pit bull type (7):
    Christina Burleson, 43 years old, Houston, Texas.
    Klonda S. Richey, 57 years old, Dayton, Ohio.
    Nancy Newberry, 77 years old, Phoenix, AZ. **
    Dorothy Hamilton, 85 years old, Kaufman, TX **
    Petra Aguirre, 83 years old, San Antonio TX
    Betty Clark, 75 years old, San Antonio TX
    Katie Morrison, 20-years old, Smiths Station, AL

    That’s 85% killed by attacking pit bull type dogs.
    Pit Bull type dogs are only about 6% of the entire dog population.

    Summer Sears, 4 years old, Tallassee, AL by Husky/German Shepard Cross
    Nyhiem Wilfong, 1 year old, Caldwell County, N.C. by Rottweiler. **

    89-year-old Annabell Martin, Corona, CA. by her grandson’s three Rottweilers.**
    *******************************************************************
    33 People dead by dog attack in 2013.
    Pit bull type dogs killed thirty of them. sixteen of the twenty-nine dead are children.
    Stars indicate people killed by a ‘family’ pit bull – ones that had been raised and cherished as an indoor pet, ‘never showed aggression before’, and knew the victim.

    Child fatalities by pit bull type dog (16):
    Christian Gormanous – 4 yrs old Montgomery County, TX
    Isaiah Aguilar – 2 yrs old Sabinal, TX
    Ryan Maxwell – 7 yrs old ** Galesburg, IL.
    Dax Borchardt – 14 mos old ** Walworth, WI.
    Monica Laminack – 21 mos old ** Ellabelle, GA.
    Tyler Jett – 7 yrs old Callaway, FL.
    Jordyn Arndt – 4 yrs old ** Prairie City, IA.
    Beau Rutledge – 2 yrs old ** Fulton County, GA.
    Ayden Evans- 5 yrs old ** Jessieville, AR.
    Nephi Selu – 6 yrs old ** Union City, CA.
    Arianna Jolee Merrbach – 5 yrs old Effingham, SC.
    Daniel (surname as yet not revealed) – 2 yrs old (Gilbert, Arizona) **
    Samuel Eli Zamudio – 2 yrs old** Colton, CA
    Jordan Ryan– 5 yrs old Baker city, Oregon
    Levi Watson-Bradford-4 years old** White County, Arkansas
    Jah’niyah White – 2 years old ** Chicago, Ill

    Adult fatalities by pit bull type (13):
    Betty Todd – 65 yrs old ** Hodges, SC
    Elsie Grace – 91 yrs old ** Hemet, CA
    Claudia Gallardo – 38 yrs old Stockton, CA.
    Pamela Devitt – 63 yrs old Littlerock, CA.
    Carlton Freeman – 80 yrs old Harleyville, SC.
    Linda Oliver – 63 yrs old Dayton, TX.
    James Harding – 62 yrs old -Baltimore, MD
    chased into traffic by two attacking pit bulls
    Juan Campos – 96 yrs old Katy, Texas.
    Terry Douglass 56 years old. **Baltimore, MD
    Katherine Atkins-25 years old ** Kernersville, NC
    Nga Woodhead-65 years old Spanaway, WA.
    Joan Kappen, 75 years old Hot Springs Ark
    Michal Nelson, 41 years old Valencia County, New Mexico **

    (1 non-pit type killing) [Rachel Honabarger – 35 yrs old – mauled to death by her own GSD mix] Coshocton, OH.

    (1 husky-mix killing, unknown if the other half of the dog was pit bull) [Jordan Lee Reed – 5 yrs old] Kotzebue, AK

    (1 Shiba Inu killing) Mia Gibson – age 3 months, of Gibson, OH – mauled to death by family Shiba Inu.

    Three of the pit bull type dogs were BULL mastiffs, ie 40% pit-fighting bulldog.

    If 27 of 33 dead were killed by pit bull attack, that’s 82% dead by pit attack, 9% dead by ‘molosser’, 3% by some kind of GSD mix, 3% by a husky + possibly pit mix, 3% by Shiba Inu.

    If you count the pit-mix mastiffs as pit bull types, that’s 91% killed by attacking pit bull types. Pit types are only about 6% of the entire dog population.

    The man who ran into traffic kept pit bulls himself. He knew perfectly well what the two stranger pit bulls that were chasing him would do if they caught him, so he preferred to risk a swift death by oncoming car.

    534 maimed by pit type dogs 2013 (as of November.28).

    • v f

      bull mastiffs are not 40% pitbull……they have absolutely no pitbull in them whatsoever…the “bull” part in their name is misleading to a person who knows nothing of the breed. when the breed was developed, mastiff and bull dog was used, in some lines, great danes and other breeds were also used….do your research instead of spewing regurgitated half baked statistical reports……dogs raised improperly(even family pets who showed no aggression that did it to family) are the problem not the breed. if Chihuahuas were big enough, they would be number one killers….there mouths just are not big enough to do the deadly damage….that is a vicious breed

      • Darrin Stephens

        The bullmastiff is a large breed of domestic dog, with a solid build and a short muzzle.

        The bullmastiff shares the characteristics of Molosser dogs, and was originally developed by 19th-century gamekeepers to guard estates.

        The breed’s bloodlines are drawn from the English Mastiff and Old English Bulldoggie.

        It was recognized as a purebred dog by the English Kennel Club in 1924.

        The Bullmastiff was a cross of 40% Old English Bulldog or pit bull type dog (not the short, chubby Bulldog of today) and 60% English Mastiff for its size, strength and loyalty.

  • Darrin Stephens

    About 31,400 dogs attacked about 61,500 other animals in the U.S. in 2013, killing 43,500 and seriously injuring 18,100.

    The animals killed included about 12,000 dogs, 8,000 cats, 6,000 hooved animals, and 17,000 other small domestic animals, primarily poultry.

    The seriously injured included about 12,400 dogs, 4,000 cats, and 1,700 hooved animals. Few small mammals and poultry survived reported dog attacks.

    Pit bulls inflicted 99% of the total fatal attacks on other animals (43,000); 96% of the fatal attacks on other dogs (11,520); 95% of the fatal attacks on livestock (5,700) and on small mammals and poultry (16,150); and 94% of the fatal attacks on cats (11,280).

    About 30,000 pit bulls were involved in attacks on other animals, many of them killing multiple other animals.

    There are about 3.2 million pit bulls in the U.S. at any given time, according to the annual Animal24-7 surveys of dogs offered for sale or adoption via online classified ads.

    Thus in 2013 about one pit bull in 107 killed or seriously injured another animal, compared with about one dog in 50,000 of other breeds.

    Nationally, fatal and disfiguring attacks by dogs from shelters and rescues have exploded from zero in the first 90 years of the 20th century to 80 since 2010, including 58 by pit bulls, along with 22 fatal & disfiguring attacks by other shelter dogs, mostly Rottweilers & bull mastiffs.

    Altogether, 33 U.S. shelter dogs have participated in killing people since 2010, including 24 pit bulls, seven bull mastiffs, and two Rottweilers.

    The only dogs rehomed from U.S. shelters to kill anyone before 2000 were two wolf hybrids, rehomed in 1988 and 1989, respectively.

  • Darrin Stephens

    Merritt Clifton Editor Of Animals24-7:

    Of the 4,735 dogs involved in fatal and disfiguring attacks on humans occurring in the U.S. & Canada since September 1982, when I began logging the data, 3,207 (68%) were pit bulls; 550 were Rottweilers; 4,035 (85%) were of related molosser breeds, including pit bulls, Rottweilers, mastiffs, bull mastiffs, boxers, and their mixes.

    Of the 553 human fatalities, 291 were killed by pit bulls; 86 were killed by Rottweilers; 417 (75%) were killed by molosser breeds.

    Of the 2,854 people who were disfigured, 1,943 (68%) were disfigured by pit bulls; 321 were disfigured by Rottweilers; 2,419 (84%) were disfigured by molosser breeds.

    Pit bulls–exclusive of their use in dogfighting–also inflict more than 70 times as many fatal and disfiguring injuries on other pets and livestock as on humans, a pattern unique to the pit bull class.

    Fatal and disfiguring attacks by dogs from shelters and rescues have exploded from zero in the first 90 years of the 20th century to 80 in the past four years, including 58 by pit bulls, along with 22 fatal & disfiguring attacks by other shelter dogs, mostly Rottweilers & bull mastiffs.

    The only dogs rehomed from U.S. shelters to kill anyone, ever, before 2000 were two wolf hybrids in 1988 and 1989. 33 U.S. shelter dogs & one U.K. shelter dog have participated in killing people since 2010, including 24 pit bulls, seven bull mastiffs, and two Rottweilers.

    Surveys of dogs offered for sale or adoption indicate that pit bulls and pit mixes are less than 6% of the U.S. dog population; molosser breeds, all combined, are 9%.

  • Darrin Stephens

    My Legislation Proposal to be enacted by all states,
    cities and counties in the US & Canada.

    All dogs must be:
    Or all dangerous dogs must be:
    Or all dangerous molosser breeds, including pit bulls (American Staffordshire Terrier, Staffordshire bull terriers, American pit bull terriers, American Bulldog, Bull mastiffs, dogo argentinos, fila brasieros, presa canarios, Japanese Tosa, cane corsos and their mixes and any dog generally recognized as a pit bull or pit bull terrier and includes a dog of mixed breed with predominant pit bull or pit bull terrier characteristics), rottweilers, chow chows, Doberman pinschers, German shepherds, must be:

    * Licensed
    * All Pit bull type dogs Micro-chipped with any bite history in database for reference.
    * Insured: All dogs must be covered by mandatory liability insurance of $100,000 min. generic and $500,000 after a skin breaking bite with insurance companies based on actuarial statistic’s determining said rate.
    * Spayed/neutered (except for limited approved show dog breeders)
    * All breeds involved in any bite incident must be kenneled in a locked five-sided enclosure with concrete bottom.

    For all other dog owners language can be written that enclosure such as fences must be capable of containing your dog period, such generic language puts the onus on the owner, have the fines be so onerous that said owner will ensure this they make this so.

    1,000 the first time, double the second time and permanent confiscation the third time with a ban on said person from owning any dog within city limits, this will create an effective outcome directly or indirectly.
    * All dogs must be on leashes outside of home enclosure
    * All molosser breeds must also be muzzled outside of home enclosure

    * No transport of declared dangerous dogs for the purpose of re-homing. (Dangerous dogs must be dealt with where their history is known.)
    * All of the rules listed above also apply to rescues: rescued dogs must be licensed and subject to inspection.

    $1,000 fine for noncompliance
    Elimination of the one-bite rule in all of the 50 U.S. states
    Manslaughter charges for owner of dog that kills a human
    Felony charge for owner of dog that mauls human, dog, or other domestic animal.

  • George Byron

    Another freaking pit bull attack. I love dogs, and I hate to say it but this breed needs to be eradicated!!! And don’t whine about how wonderful the pit bull is, it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to be able to read the statistics, and the facts don’t lie!!!!!!

    • nowhere_freeway

      so, you only hold the dog responsible, not the human that trained the dog? now that is pure stupidity.

  • Darrin Stephens

    Ottumwa, Iowa
    Population 24,998

    In July 2010, Police Chief Jim Clark said there had been no recorded pit bull attacks since the city’s 2003 pit bull ban. Between 1989 and 2003, the city had a pit bull ordinance, but still allowed pit bulls as “guard” dogs.
    “Police Chief Jim Clark says since the ban, there have been no recorded attacks by the animals.

    “We haven’t had any attacks since then for one thing because it is illegal,” said Clark. “Most people are keeping their dogs inside their house or inside their basement and not letting them out loose so therefore they’re not around other people to attack them.”

    “In the two-and-a-half years before the 2003 ban, Ottumwa police recorded 18 pit bull attacks, including the death of 21-month-old Charlee Shepherd in August 2002. There were at least three other attacks on children during this time.”
    ************************************************************
    Little Rock, Arkansas
    Population 189,515

    When the City of Indianapolis was discussing a pit bull sterilization law in April 2009, Little Rock Animal Services Director Tracy Roark spoke about Little Rock’s successful 2008 pit bull ordinance:

    “There was a day when you could walk down any street in center city Little Rock, you could see several pit bulls chained up. You don’t see that anymore,” said Tracy Roark with Little Rock Animal Services.

    Roark told Eyewitness News over the phone that pit bull attacks have been cut in half and credits their new law with getting them there.
    “This is the most abused dog in the city,” said Roark.

    The Little Rock law passed last year and requires pit bulls to be sterilized, registered and microchipped. Also dogs – regardless of the breed – are also not allowed to be chained up outside.”
    ************************************************************
    Fort Lupton, Colorado
    Population 6,787
    When the City of Fort Collins was mulling a pit bull law in March 2009, Fort Lupton’s Police Chief spoke about Fort Lupton’s successful 2003 pit bull ban, including zero pit bull biting incidents since the law’s adoption:

    “Fort Lupton Police Chief Ron Grannis said the city hasn’t had a pit bull bite since the ban was enacted, but it still has the occasional pit bull that is picked up and taken away.

    Although he said the ban has not been well-received by every resident, he thinks it was the right decision for the city.

    “I believe it makes the community safer,” he said. “That’s my personal opinion. Pit bulls are not the kind of dogs most people should have. They are too unpredictable. … These dogs have been bred for thousands of years to be fighters.

    You can’t take it out of them. A lion cub may be friendly for a while, but one day it can take your head off.”
    ************************************************************
    Reading, Pennsylvania
    Population 80,560

    After an 8-year legal battle, pit bull advocates dismantled a pit bull law adopted by Reading in 1998. It was reported in the same news article, in February 2008, that the law had significantly reduced biting incidents:

    “Reading’s 1998 law required that aggressive or dangerous dogs, when outside the home, be muzzled and kept on a leash shorter than three feet long with a minimum tensile strength of 300 pounds.

    The law also punished violators with fines of up to $1,000 or 30 days in jail.
    The law is credited with helping to reduce dog bites from 130 in 1999 to 33 in 2006. As a result, the law – or at least elements of it – were not being actively enforced, the Reading Eagle reported last year.

  • Ratt Mann

    Mandatory spay and neuter and microchip ALL breeds. There are many pit bull “Type” dogs out there which are mutts due to irresponsible people who don’t spay or neuter. BSL seems like the right idea but is hard to enforce.

    • Darrin Stephens

      Last Summer, Riverside County supervisors unanimously passed an ordinance requiring pit bulls older than 4 months in unincorporated areas of the county to be spayed or neutered. Registered breeders, law enforcement and therapy dogs are exempt from the ordinance, which takes effect next month.

      In 2010, San Bernardino County supervisors passed a similar ordinance for unincorporated areas of the county, such as Mentone. Owners of non-sterilized pit bulls can be fined $100 for the first offense, $200 for the second and $300 for subsequent offenses.

      Highland and Yucaipa adopted the same ordinance, according to Brian Cronin, chief of the county’s animal control division, which handles animal control in those two cities.

      The San Bernardino County ordinance said pit bull breeds account for about 20 percent of the dogs at animal shelters and are put down more often than any other breed.

      Cronin emailed figures showing the county’s intake of pit bulls has decreased 28 percent since the ordinance took effect and that euthanization rates have dropped by 56 percent.

      In August 2011, San Bernardino County Animal Care and Control, which oversees unincorporated areas and Highland and Yucaipa, reported a 9.6 decrease in dog bites after enacting a pit bull sterilization law in 2010.

      The law, approved unanimously by the Board of Supervisors last week, expands upon an ordinance approved last year that requires pit bull owners to spay or neuter their pets.

      Supervisor Neil Derry introduced the original proposal in response to an increasing number of attacks by pit bulls in recent years that resulted in four deaths — two of them young children — in the last five years.

      The county saw a 9.6 percent decrease in dog bites in the year since the spay/neuter program was instituted, said Brian Cronin, the county’s animal care and control division chief.

      The ordinance was passed to reduce the number of dogs destroyed at taxpayer expense, Cronin said.

      HAS MANDATORY S/N FOR PITS WORKED FOR SAN BERNARDINO, CA?
      YES!!

      The following is the six (6) year trend for Pit Bull admissions and euthanasia of this specific type/breed of dog in County owned or operated animal shelter facilities:

      FY 2007-08 Admissions 1,623 Euthanized 1,276 (78.6% of intake)

      FY 2008-09 Admissions 1,705 Euthanized 1,321 (77.4%) of intake)

      FY 2009-10 Admissions 2,066 Euthanized 1,593 (77.1% of intake)

      FY 2010-11 Admissions 2,523 Euthanized 1,632 (64.6% of intake)

      FY 2011-12 Admissions 2,265 Euthanized 1,085 (47.9% of intake)

      FY 2012-13 Admissions 1,815 Euthanized 727 (40% of intake)

      You will note, the percentage of Pit Bull type dogs euthanized has been significantly reduced since the implementation of the San Bernardino County Mandatory Pit Bull sterilization ordinance.

      The ordinance was implemented in fiscal year 2010-11 in which Pit Bull admissions hit an all time high of 2,523. Last year Pit Bull admissions were at 1,815.

      This is a significant reduction in admissions for this type of dog after the ordinance was passed. You can not argue that spay/neuter hasn’t had a positive impact

  • demonicwings

    Do any of you people ever stop and think what the hell these kids did to the dogs to prompt a response like that? Dogs don’t just bite people willy nilly. It’s not a bite-and-run ordeal. They had to have been given a warning that the dog might have turn violent, a growl, the stance, SOMETHING, and they had to have kept doing whatever it was that was making the dog have that response. Take responsibility for your children’s actions. Whenever my dog nipped or bit me when I was little, it was almost always because I would have hit her or pulled on her tail. Luckily she was small, but bigger dogs do damage.

    • rahbinah

      @demonicwings:
      How do you explain then the countless stories of dogs attacking babies while they are sleeping and little old ladies who are taking their leisurely strolls???

      Dogs can and do attack without provocation. Just because you abused your dog before it attacked you does not mean this is the case for every person that suffers a dog attack. See you dog nutters hate to admit that dogs are not as domesticated as you believe. Many of them are ticking time bombs that cannot be socialized. There are plenty of vicious, good for nothing dogs out there that would not hesitate to attack an innocent person who is simply walking down the street, minding their own business. You give dogs way too much credit. Dogs are NOT man’s best friend—more like man’s worst nightmare—especially when they lack training.

  • catsrus

    While I was stationed in Spain, there were some excellent, common-sense regulations for “dangerous dogs” enacted: dog must be vetted (shots and spayed/neutered), owner must carry liability insurance for the dog, owner must pass a psych evaluation and have written proof of all this to apply for a license – this license must be carried by the owner or caretaker, along with muzzle and appropriate sized collar and leash whenever the dog is outside its home or fenced yard. Failure to show proof means confiscation of the dog and hefty fine for the owner – no “just let the dog stay in jail or be put down” option… The psych eval and insurance part with license requirement would help cut back on some of the aggressive dogs that idiots keep breeding down here in AL…

  • nowhere_freeway

    darrin stephens can fill up the blog with endless statistics and generalizations/lies but for every horrible story about PB type dogs, there are multiple stories of loving family pets. darrin your legislation proposal will fall flat – who will comply with it??? only law abiding citizens – who care and train their dogs properly, not the a-holes who tie up the dog outside and use for protection/security/fighting. besides, if vick can have a dog after the unspeakable things he did a few years back, what’s the point???

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