Visitors flocking to Missouri Botanical Garden to see the corpse flower

ST. LOUIS - Visitors have been flocking to see the corpse flower at the Missouri Botanical Garden.

For those of you who are faint of heart and weak of stomach, I must warn you, this story is filled with chills, suspense, horror, the weird, and the gruesome.

Meet the corpse flower.

“Ammorphopallus titanium.  They call it the titan arum.  But corpse flower is what it`s translated from its Indonesian name,” said Emily Colletti, a horticulturist Missouri Botanical Garden.

Why Vincent Price himself would cackle with delight over the putrid odor that accompanies this plant.

Eight corpse flower blooms in five years have brought a cult like following for the unique giant arum.

The spade mimics rotting meat and the smell it releases mimics rotting meat.  That`s where it gets its name corpse flower because it smells and looks like something dead.

The botanical garden knew on June 26th this plant was going to bloom and the countdown began.

Social media is making the plant that hails from the Pacific island of Sumatra in Indonesia, an internet sensation.

“This one is doing a fine job in its debut staying open and gorgeous and strutting her stuff.  I think by mid-afternoon tomorrow it may be all the way closed," Colletti said.

This plant, named Octavia, weighs 103 pounds, and first came to the Missouri Botanical Garden from the Huntington Library in California in 2008.

Back then it was just a small tuber.

“It`s fun to watch.  In the U.S. Capitol, they had one bloom August 2nd last year and then two years ago before.  I need to talk to the guy and see what he does cause theirs are seven or eight feet tall.  So, I need to see what he does.  There`s probably a lot of fertilizer in Washington D.C."