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Missed the eclipse today? America’s next one is in 2024

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So you missed it. Maybe you’re stuck in the office, traveling, at an ill-timed appointment, the victim of bad weather, unable to procure eclipse glasses, driving or simply in the wrong place at the wrong time. It happens.

The St. Louis area won’t have to wait long for another chance to be at the center of another total solar eclipse.  There is a second eclipse on April 8, 2024, that will cross from Mexico to Maine.  The path of that eclipse will be right over Carbondale.

In fact, the two eclipse paths form an intersection just south of the SIU-Carbondale campus around Cedar Lake, making it a unique location for being able to observe and study both eclipses from the same location.

Although Monday’s eclipse was peaking over two minutes in the path of totality, the 2024 eclipse will have peaks of 4½ minutes. In the United States, it will be visible in a diagonal path crossing from Texas to Maine, according to NASA.

Cities like Austin, Texas; Dallas; Little Rock, Arkansas; Indianapolis; Toledo, Cleveland and Akron, Ohio; Buffalo and Rochester, New York; Montpelier, Vermont; and Montreal will also be directly in the path of totality.

Given the planning by many in preparation for the 2017 eclipse, you might want to start making your hotel and travel arrangements now. And stock up on eclipse glasses once they become widely available again.

If you’re eclipse chaser who doesn’t mind globetrotting, you can also catch these total solar eclipses around the world in the coming years:

  • 2019: South Pacific, Chile, Argentina
  • 2020: South Pacific, Chile, Argentina, South Atlantic
  • 2021: Antarctica
  • 2026: the Arctic, Greenland, Iceland, Spain
  • 2027: Morocco, Spain, Algeria, Libya, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Somalia
  • 2028: Australia, New Zealand
  • 2030: Botswana, South Africa, Australia