Melenie Broyles: Work Email Etiquette

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(KTVI) - When you get to work, is your inbox flooded with group emails? Does it make you wonder, "why did I get this? It doesn't even pertain to me."

Now, car maker Ferrari is banning it's 3,000 employees from sending group emails to more than three people.  That's it.  They say group emails are a time-waster and cuts down on productivity and efficiency in the office. Good idea?

Etiquette expert Melenie Broyles of Etiquette Saint Louis has some tips.

Tips for overuse of cc, bcc, reply and reply all on email-

1. If people are receiving too many emails in an organization then many of them are going unread.  It is similar to a lengthy voice mail message that is deleted before all the details have been heard.

2. Only send an email to the people who absolutely need the information and will be acting on the information.

3. If an email is sent to more than a small group, waiting on replies could make the decision never happen.  If a person does not need to reply, then do not send the information to them.

4. Never send an email when a face to face conversation or telephone call would be more effective.  Expressions of tone and visual facial expression are essential to determining a process effectively.

5. When dealing with anything controversial, a face to face or call is the best option.  Tone can be missing and assumed in an email.

6. "Reply all" is over used and actually can cause someone to be seen in a negative light.  Only use this when everyone needs your response to move forward not to let everyone know you are questioning the sender.

7. Never use cc as a way to tattle or be condescending.

8. Only use blind copy when absolutely necessary.  If someone has information that should not have it may be from your email.

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