President Obama calls for fresh focus on economy

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(KTVI) -- President Barack Obama took his economic speech to the University of Central Missouri Wednesday in Warrensburg.

A crowd of students, professors, alums and towns people crowded into a gymnasium in the student REC center, many of them standing for five hours and more to hear the president speak on the campus.

The White House is making it clear the president wants to move away from political gridlock.

"Where I can act on my own, I'm going to. I'm not going to wait for Congress," President Obama said during a speech at the University of Central Missouri.

President Obama wants to turn the nation's attention to strengthening the economy.  After $800 billion plus in stimulus spending unemployment is still at 7.6 percent and millions more are under employed.
President Obama told the crowd, "If we don't make the investments America needs to make this country a magnet for good jobs, if we don't make investments in education and manufacturing and science and research and transp. And information networks we will be waving the white flag while other countries forge ahead in the global economy."

The president came to the University of Central Missouri because the university is pioneering a program to help capable students prepare for careers in fields where there is a demand.

"That is exactly the kind of innovation we need when it comes to college costs," President Obama said.  "I welcome ideas from anybody across the political spectrum but I'm not going to allow gridlock or inaction willful indifference to get in this country's way we've got to get moving."

Missouri's innovation campus program is being duplicated on other state campuses.

President Obama said he would offer more details about programs to help strengthen the economy in the coming weeks.

Republicans are already speaking out against what they anticipate will be the president's plan for more spending and higher taxes.

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