Political groups using voting report cards to get voters to the polls

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MAPLEWOOD, MO (KTVI) - Thousands of Missouri voters are receiving report cards in the mail. Grades are given based on how often voters head to the polls. The report card also includes voting grades for neighbors. The conservative leaning political action committee Grow Missouri is behind the mailings.

"Our overall purpose is to increase and promote election participation and voter turnout," said Grow Missouri Treasurer Aaron Willard. He said the report cards were randomly sent to voters prior to Tuesday's election.

"We're not advocating for a candidate. We're not advocating for a certain issue or a campaign," said Willard. "We are specifically just trying to get people to make sure that they show up on November 4th."

Voters also received a note reading, "Vote November 4th to improve your score on the next report."

"It's absolutely a violation of my privacy," said one University City voter.

Willard said the report cards to do not include any information about how voters cast their ballots. Everything on the report card is a matter of public record. Grow Missouri found similar methods in other states increased voter turnout by as much as 8%.

"We are trying a number of things," said Willard. "The report cards are just one of them."

Willard believes Missouri is the perfect place to test the effectiveness of the report card mailings. He points out most of the statewide officer holders are democrats, while republicans control the Missouri House and Senate.

"I think that indicates that Missourians are very independent minded voters," said Willard. "I think that even makes this more interesting."

Not everyone agrees. We talked with some voters who said issues should be what drives voter turnout, not a report card.

Willard said Grow Missouri will do a post-election analysis to determine if the reports cards did boost turnout in Missouri.​