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People looking to score heroin, interrupt police raid of house suspected of drug dealing

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WOOD RIVER, IL (KTVI) - Knocks on the door repeatedly interrupted Illinois State Police during a heroin raid in Wood River.

Ten people showed up looking to buy heroin with police in the house, police said.

It all began when an informant made an undercover heroin buy at the home in the 100 block of West Penning according to court documents. That led to a search of the resident's trash in the alley.  Police found baggies with the corners missing: a clue consistent with heroin use/dealing, police told FOX 2.

The house is at the end of a well-kept, quiet street.

The everyday solitude was suddenly shattered by the police raid last week, neighbors said.

“I just happened to walk out the door and it looked like the SWAT team was here,” a woman recalled.

Illinois State Police SWAT and undercover drug agents were there executing a search warrant after earlier finding those baggies.

Small amounts of heroin are often packaged in baggies.  Users cut the corners to get every bit of heroin inside and avoid losing any by emptying the baggie from the top, police said.

Police found syringes in the home, baggie corners with heroin residue, $2,300 cash in a safe, and 1.5 grams of raw heroin, according to court documents.

The raid was repeatedly interrupted by the knocking at the door.  10 people came looking to buy heroin during in about a 90 minute period only to find undercover officers in their state police vests on the other side of the door, police said.

Charges are likely but have yet to be filed against the suspected dealer and the 10 people who came knocking.  There’s a preliminary forfeiture proceeding at the Madison Criminal Justice Center Thursday.

The prosecutor is pushing for the state to seize what he considers “drug money”.