Salt intake and your heart

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Would you eat too much of something that causes stroke, kidney, and cardiovascular disease? And raises the risk of having a heart attack? Too many of do so every day by eating more than our daily recommending allowance of salt.

Salt is needed to maintain a healthy fluid balance, help muscles contract and relax normally, as well as helping nerves.

Any menu item containing more than 2,300 milligrams (0.08 oz) of sodium, the daily limit many nutritionists recommend and which equals about one teaspoon of salt, must display the emblem of a salt shaker in a black triangle.

A Chipotle loaded chicken burrito (2,790 mg), Subway's foot-long spicy Italian sub (2,980 mg), TGIFriday's classic buffalo wings (3,030 mg) or Applebee's grilled shrimp and spinach salad (2,990 mg).

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in New York City, claiming nearly 17,000 lives in 2013, the health department said. It noted a "well-established connection" between sodium intake and high blood pressure, a major risk factor for heart attack and stroke.

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