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Understanding Prop C, the medical marijuana initiative

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ST. LOUIS – One of the medical marijuana initiatives on the ballot for voters is Proposition C.

Supporters say the ordinance is long overdue and will provide people suffering from medical conditions with easy and affordable access to medical marijuana.

they say prop c provides the best situation on all fronts.

Mark Habbas, a spokesman for Missourians for Patient Care, is asking voters to pass medical marijuana laws. He says if people study the facts, they'll see that Proposition C is the most effective way to do so.

“We set it up to provide the best patient access and we set it up to have the lowest tax because insurance doesn't cover it,” Habbas said.

To be clear: Prop C would not legalize the recreational use of marijuana. There are no recreational initiatives on the ballot.

Under Prop C, you would need written certification by a physician who treats a patient diagnosed with a qualifying medical condition. It would allow the growth, possession, production, and sale of medical marijuana by licensed and regulated facilities.

It would also place a 2 percent tax on the retail sale—the lowest of the initiatives on the upcoming—and the money generated from the tax would go straight to state veterans’ services.

“Our initiative allows for five ounces a month, two and a half every 14 days,” Habbas said.

That’s the largest amount of the three initiatives presented on the ballot. Habbas says it also allows patients more freedom depending on their condition.

The Missouri Division of Alcohol would issue licenses for dispensaries and the Department of Health and Senior Services would issue patient access cards. Some of the conditions covered are cancer, migraines, HIV, chronic pain, and seizures.

“The felt it should be legalized here in Missouri because they don't want to travel to Colorado and California and other states that have medical marijuana laws,” Habbas said.

Medical marijuana is estimated to generate about $10 million annually for Missouri.

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