Kindergartner’s mother wants to know why she’s not allowed to see letter written to her son

MEHLVILLE, Mo. – The mother of a Mehlville School District kindergartener says Beasley Elementary read a letter to her son—written by another parent, questioning his behavior—but won’t let her see it. The district has another take on the matter.

Brandi Ruhland wants to know why the kindergarten teacher read a letter to her son written by a classmate's parent and she isn’t allowed to see the letter.

“It’s ridiculous. Anything shown to a 6-year-old can be shown to their parent,” she said.

Ruhland said the kindergarten teacher called her on February 20 and told her another parent wrote a letter to her son regarding an incident with their daughter. The teacher read the note to her son. Ruhland went to the school that day and asked to see the letter.

“Immediately, the answer was ‘no.’ … They told me it was a confidentiality concern and privacy concern,” she said.

Ruhland said she has a right to see the letter. She doesn’t believe it was malicious but doesn’t understand what the Mehlville School District is trying to hide?

The district provided the following response:

"We are aware of a complaint from the parent you are referring to. This parent has requested to see communication between a different parent and the classroom teacher. Due to confidentiality, we cannot share this type of communication with other parents, however, we told the concerned parent about the sentence that referenced her child.This parent is requesting a copy of the letter, and we cannot provide that due to privacy laws. Administrators have met with the concerned parent, as well as emailed her, called and requested follow-up meetings with her. We thought this matter had been resolved. We welcome additional conversations with the parent."

Ruhland said the entire matter can be resolved by allowing her to see the letter. She said the superintendent reached out to discuss the issue with her as recently as last night but Ruhland said she wants everything to be in writing.

“I think they know they did something wrong and not showing me now. And they are digging in their heels and sticking to their guns,” she said.

Ruhland posted the story on social media and several moms said they didn't know if a teacher could read another letter to the child, written by another parent, and not let the child's parent see the letter?

We asked the district if that was standard procedure and have not heard back.

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