Resolution focused on gun safety is withdrawn at St. Louis city school board meeting

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ST. LOUIS - The St. Louis city school board withdraws a resolution designed to help promote gun safety then board members refuse to speak about it.

In fact, the resolution did not even make it to a vote at the school board meeting downtown at the district headquarters on Tuesday night.

Board member Dr. Joyce Roberts sponsored the resolution.

It would have required a letter be sent home to all parents or guardians of city school district students talking about safe gun storage.

The letter would have been written by city school district Superintendent Dr. Kelvin Adams.

Parents or guardians would have been required to sign the letter and send it back to school.

Board of Aldermen President Lewis Reed and the group Everytown for Gun Safety proposed the policy.

The idea came after at least 28 children were killed in the St. Louis area last year including around a dozen in the city of St. Louis.

Instead of voting on the resolution, Roberts withdrew it and board members talked about moving forward on a resolution they adopted last November focused on combatting community violence.

After the meeting, three different members of the board including the board president refused to speak on camera about the issue.

Members including Roberts did talk about the resolution during the meeting.

“This resolution could really help demonstrate the power of parents in our community and in our schools to make a difference in gun violence. This resolution would just have been another tool to keep our students safe,” explained Roberts.

Kim Westerman with Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America added, “We`re disappointed that the resolution was withdrawn because we think it really could have been effective. But we know that there`s other ways that we can partner with the district to get the message out about proper gun storage.”

Westerman`s group also was involved with crafting the resolution.

Other school districts that have already taken action like what was considered by the city school board include Los Angeles, Phoenix, and Denver.

It`s unclear whether the resolution might come back up before the board.

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