KANSAS CITY, Mo. – When Missourians go to the polls on Tuesday, Nov. 8, every voter will have to answer five very important questions on their ballot. These five ballot measures are simple “Yes” or “No” questions, but the consequences of each decision will be felt in the years to come.

Ballot wording can sometimes be confusing. This is what a “yes” or a “no” vote means on each of the four constitutional amendments Missouri voters will see at the polls, according to fair ballot language.

Constitutional Amendment No. 1

Ballot Language

Do you want to amend the Missouri Constitution to:

  • allow the General Assembly to override the current constitutional restrictions of state investments by the state treasurer; and
  • allow state investments in municipal securities possessing one of the top five highest long term ratings or the highest short term rating?

State governmental entities estimate no costs and increased interest revenue of $2 million per year. Local governmental entities estimate no costs and increased interest revenue of at least $34,000 per year.

Based on Fair Ballot Language provided by the election board, this is what voting yes and voting no on Missouri Constitutional Amendment No. 1 means:

Yes Vote:

A “yes” vote will amend the Missouri Constitution to grant the General Assembly statutory authority to invest state funds and also expand the state treasurer’s investment options.

Currently the Constitution grants the General Assembly no statutory investment authority and limits the treasurer’s investment options.

This amendment will allow the General Assembly by statute to determine investment avenues for the state treasurer to invest state funds, as well as allow the state treasurer to invest in municipal securities.

No Vote:

A “no” vote will not amend the Missouri Constitution and limit the treasurer to investigate state funds only in those investment options currently approved by the Constitution.

Constitutional Amendment No. 3

Legalizing Marijuana Initiative Ballot Language

Do you want to amend the Missouri Constitution to:

  • remove state prohibitions on purchasing, possessing, consuming, using, delivering, manufacturing, and selling marijuana for personal use for adults over the age of
    twenty-one;
  • require a registration card for personal cultivation with prescribed limits;
  • allow persons with certain marijuana-related non-violent offenses to petition for release from incarceration or parole and probation and have records expunged;
  • establish a lottery selection process to award licenses and certificates;
  • issue equally distributed licenses to each congressional district; and
  • impose a 6% tax on the retail price of marijuana to benefit various programs?

State governmental entities estimate initial costs of $3.1 million, initial revenues of at least $7.9
million, annual costs of $5.5 million, and annual revenues of at least $40.8 million.

Local governments are estimated to have annual costs of at least $35,000 and annual revenues of at least $13.8 million.

Based on Fair Ballot Language provided by the election board, this is what voting yes and voting no on Missouri Constitutional Amendment No. 3 means:

Yes Vote

A yes vote supports the idea to legalize marijuana and remove state prohibitions on the purchase, possession, consumption, use, delivery, manufacture, and sale of marijuana for personal use for adults over the age of 21.

The amendment would also allow individuals with certain marijuana-related offenses to petition for release from prison or parole and probation and have their records expunged; along with imposing a 6% tax on the retail price of recreational marijuana.

No Vote

A no vote opposes legalizing marijuana for the sale and use of recreational purposes and will remain prohibited under current law.

Supporting and Opposing Arguments

Supporters say it’s time to stop prosecuting people for marijuana violations, but some people who are in support of that argument believe Amendment 3 goes about it the wrong way.

Others disagree and believe marijuana shouldn’t ever be legalized.

There are also voters who support legalizing marijuana, but don’t believe Amendment 3 is the right answer. They are unhappy about the possession limits and other restrictions included in the amendment.

Legal Missouri 2022, which successfully got the initiative on the ballot in November, pushes back on the idea that a constitutional amendment locks in a recreational cannabis program. 

Constitutional Amendment No. 4

Police Funding Ballot Language

Shall the Missouri Constitution be amended to authorize laws, passed before December 31,
2026, that increase minimum funding for a police force established by a state board of police
commissioners to ensure such police force has additional resources to serve its communities?

State and local governmental entities estimate no additional costs or savings related to this
proposal.

Yes Vote

A yes vote supports allowing Missouri’s legislature to increase the required minimum funding to the Kansas City Police Department, or other police force established by a state board of police commissioners.

Currently the only police force established by the state board of police commissioners is found in Kansas City, Missouri.

No Vote

A no vote opposes allowing Missouri’s legislature to increase minimum funding for the Kansas City Police Department, or other police force established by a state board of police commissioners.

Supporting and Opposing Arguments

The controversy over this issue is one state and city leaders have been having for months.

Sen. Tony Luetkemeyer sponsored the bill in the Missouri Legislature. He said a vote for Amendment 4 ensures funding for KCPD. Kansas City’s Fraternal Order of Police agrees.

Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas disagrees and said city leaders knows what the Kansas City Police Department needs. He believes those decisions should be made locally instead of in Jefferson City.

Constitutional Amendment No. 5

National Guard Ballot Language

Shall the Missouri National Guard currently under the Missouri Department of Public Safety be its own department, known as the Missouri Department of the National Guard, which shall be
required to protect the constitutional rights and civil liberties of Missourians?

State governmental entities estimate no savings and ongoing costs of $132,000 annually. Local governmental entities estimate no costs or savings.

Yes Vote

A yes vote will amend the Missouri Constitution to create the Missouri Department of the National Guard as a new state agency, headed by an adjutant general appointed by and serving the pleasure of the governor by and with the advice and consent of the senate.

If passed, this measure will have no impact on taxes.

No Vote

A no vote will not amend the Missouri Constitution regarding the National Guard.

Supporting and Opposing Arguments

While there is no known organized opposition, supporters like State Rep. Adam Schnelting, who introduced Amendment 5, said it would be easier for the governor to deploy the National Guard during times of disaster or danger.

Constitutional Convention

Constitutional Convention Ballot Language

Shall there be a convention to revise and amend the Constitution?

Supporting and Opposing Arguments

Missouri voters are required to vote on whether the state needs to call a Constitutional Convention every 20 years.

Missourians have not voted to call a Constitutional Convention since 1942.

Supporters believe it’s time to bring the constitution into the 21st century while others believe the current laws are sufficient.