‘Misrepresentation’: Catholic Charities responds to Alex Jones’ child immigrant encounter video

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FILE- In this Sept. 5, 2018, file photo Alex Jones speaks outside of the Dirksen building of Capitol Hill in Washington. The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday, April 5, 2021, declined to hear an appeal by the Infowars host and conspiracy theorist, who was fighting a Connecticut court sanction in a defamation lawsuit brought by relatives of some of the victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)

MCALLEN, Texas (KVEO) — Radio host and conspiracy theorist Alex Jones made a trip to the Rio Grande Valley, Texas and released a video on Wednesday of an encounter he had with a group of immigrant children being transported to a charity facility.

The video shows Jones and his Infowars crew stopping a vehicle in front of the Catholic Charities of the Rio Grande Valley in the city of McAllen and claiming that the driver is “smuggling children.”

Jones attempts to push the vehicle while the other crew members question where the driver is headed.

“You are violating Texas law,” Jones yells. “We know you’re smuggling these kids. You’ve got them in the back of [the car] without children’s seats.”

They then ask why the children are being transported with no seatbelts on but little is heard from the driver to explain what is going on.

“What kind of Catholic organization is this,” asks one crew member. “Jesus stuffs people in the back of a car?”

Eventually, McAllen police officers escort the children out of the vehicle at which point the video ends.

Sister Norma Pimentel, executive director of Catholic Charities of the Rio Grande Valley, responded to the video calling it a “misrepresentation” of the work done by the organization.

Pimentel claims the video was a staged confrontation and interrupted the transportation of three mothers and their children to the Human Respite Center.

In regards to the children not wearing seatbelts in the vehicle, Pimentel stated they should have been instructed to do so, but “unfortunately, this was not the case.”

Pimentel noted that the charity is not involved in human smuggling and has worked with the administrations of Presidents Obama, Trump and Biden to ensure the humanitarian treatment of asylum seekers.

She stated in a release that all who seek help through charity are given clean clothes, food and a moment of rest at the Human Respite Center.

Pimentel condemned Infowars’s attempt to “sensationalize” the work done by the charity.

“I urge you to look past the fear-mongering and mischaracterizations,” said Pimentel. “Remember to actually see the human beings fleeing persecution and their need for human dignity, which mirrors our own.”

She encouraged people to visit the border to see the community for themselves and to volunteer to help those in need.

Jones is a well-known far-right talk show host. He has faced defamation lawsuits from parents of children killed in the Sandy Hook school shooting after making repeated claims the massacre was staged and stating the family members were actors.

He’s been accused of selling “phony coronavirus cures” and blames his conspiracy theory claims on “psychosis.”

The Infowars founder has been banned from Apple, Facebook, Spotify, Twitter and YouTube, among others, over concerns about his content.

With an unprecedented number of unaccompanied minors crossing the United States border, the country’s immigration laws and protocols surrounding are once again in the spotlight.

In recent weeks, senators from both parties have pressured the Biden administration to provide media access to overflowed migrant facilities.

KVEO reached out to Infowars for comment on the video but have not received a reply.

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